Not A Design Element : A Craft Quiz

I wish Myles had thumbs. As you can see he was helping me out while I was taking the photo. He gave those yarn tails a sniff and walked away. Smart boy. I’ll tackle them later today and get the cowl blocked. As I was working the last few rows of ribbing the same thoughts kept going through my mind and I thought there was a quiz idea there.

Feel free to answer in the comments or if you’re answering on your blog leave a link so we can read your answers. Here we go.

  • What craft skill are you most proud of? Not an entire craft, just a little skill that you feel makes you a practicer of your craft with a capital C.
  • Do you have a secret mistake that you made for ages and when you learned you were doing it wrong you wondered how you managed for so long?
  • Is there an item that you’ve made so many times you feel like an expert? Is there one that even though you’ve done it over and over you feel like an amateur?
  • Would you like to teach your craft? Have you? Do you feel like you’re giving someone a special gift when you do?

Here are my answers.

  • The one main thing that makes me feel like a Knitter with a capital K is being able to read my knitting. I never understood what a huge thing it is until I could do it. I still have trouble with new/complex stitches but for the most part I feel like I can read knitting. I don’t think I so much taught myself to read it as I learned how each stitch worked and this gave me the ability to read them.
  • For the longest time I purled by wrapping the yarn the wrong way. It made my knit stitches look weird. I now have to purl without thinking or I do it wrong.
  • By far it’s socks. I have a pattern in my head. I can look at a pattern and knit the socks to fit myself without actually following the pattern. But then I remind myself that in the olden days sock knitting was children’s work and they did it without a pattern for the entire family. I am a sweater amateur. I’ve knit a bunch. They’re easy to knit. It’s the making them fit that’s hard.
  • I have never taught professionally but I have taught a handful of people. I always feel like I’m giving them a gift. If you can make something with your own two hands that is a skill that you’ll have for a lifetime.

I look forward to reading your answers.

About nothingbutknit2

I'm a wife, mother and knitter. Watch out for my pointy sticks.
This entry was posted in Knits, Knitting, MKAL, Q & A, Quirky Knitter, yarn!. Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Not A Design Element : A Craft Quiz

  1. What craft skill are you most proud of? Not an entire craft, just a little skill that you feel makes you a practicer of your craft with a capital C.
    Lace knitting – I enjoy it, I do it well if I do say so myself, it’s fun.

    Do you have a secret mistake that you made for ages and when you learned you were doing it wrong you wondered how you managed for so long?
    No, but it took me years to develop the bravery to tackle harder stuff!

    Is there an item that you’ve made so many times you feel like an expert? Is there one that even though you’ve done it over and over you feel like an amateur?
    Like you, socks are something I can do without thinking – at least if they are toe up! If they are top down, I don’t do Kitchener stitch often enough – I’m an amateur.

    Would you like to teach your craft? Have you? Do you feel like you’re giving someone a special gift when you do?
    I’ve taught third graders knitting – after making their own needles, even. I’ve taught adults, although not professionally. I’ve coached adults into skills they weren’t sure they were ready for. But teaching was my profession, so it comes easily. Just yesterday I offered to help a fledgling knitter get beyond scarves.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My skill is top stitching in sewing. I do it well, and probably because I take my time. No hurry when doing it. Will often leave it for the next day so I am not tired.
    Not really a mistake, but learned a better way to do ssk, and won’t go back.
    My frequently made item is a nightgown. I’m sewing one now, and I think I could sew it in my sleep. My item I avoid like the plague is lace knitting.
    Haven’t taught any craft skills. Probably being a school teacher for many years made me say no way.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Alissa Head says:

    I agree about being able to read my knitting. That’s a wonderful skill. I will answer on my blog today!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Laura Kate says:

    Hi Karen!
    1.I’m proud of my knitting. Everyone tells me that my stitches are very even. I guess it is a gift, I don’t think about knitting evenly.
    2. I could never get the hang of long-tail cast on! I avoided it for eleven years. I would use my own version of the knitted on cast on instead. Finally this year I got the hang of longtail and use it in any project that has less than 100 stitches to cast on.
    3. Baby sweaters. I came up with a pattern of my own that has a hounds tooth print. I even started giving them away for charity raffles. As far as a technique I have trouble with, it’s kitchener stitch. No matter how many socks I make, I still look at a tutorial every time I need to close up the toes.
    4.I taught fiber arts techniques to a home school association group on a volunteer basis. While it was a lot of work to prepare lesson plans and materials, I really enjoyed the kids. My mantra to the beginner: Everything is hard until it is easy. Keep working at it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Mimmy Jain says:

    1. I’m proud of my colour skills. I love mixing all kinds of colours and I feel I have a natural instinct for putting the right colours together. I get loads of compliments for the colours on my finished projects, so I’m doing something right.
    2. I used to cast on stitches using a weird way I do not know the name of. It was actually perfect because it gave me a firm, solid edge for whatever I was making. But I always had to try a couple of times before I got right the length of the double tail I needed. And that was hugely frustrating. This year I learnt the long tail cast on. I’m still not 100% sure about it, but I think it’s definitely easier than what I was doing earlier. As durable? I really don’t know.
    3. Scarves. I’ve made nine of them this year and can now get number of stitches, length, everything right in my sleep. I still can’t get my head around raglan sleeves. They are always either way too large or way too small for my bingo wings.
    4. During the lockdown, I’ve been teaching a small group of ex-schoolmates to crochet. Mostly through WhatsApp messages and calls, by providing links to the right tutorials, problem-solving, and helping them choose the right yarn and hooks. They’re loving it. And I’m finding that seeing them achieve a granny square is as big a thrill as doing my own.

    Like

  6. 1. I love grafting/Kitchener. I don’t get why people don’t like it. And I can’t explain how, but I have done enough toe up socks that muscle memory takes over whenever I need to do Judy’s magic cast on. 2.(At least I think I do it right!)
    3.??? Still can’t knit anything in my sleep.
    4. One day I hope someone will approach me and ask to learn how to knit. I would be happy to pass on the craft, though I’m better at doing than explaining what I am doing.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. chrisknits says:

    1 Not looking at my knitting while I knit!
    2 Putting my machine bobbin in backwards!!! This was on my old machine, not my new ones.
    3 Hats of any kind. Can make them in my sleep. Can change the cast on numbers and decrease rates. Grafting, even though I have done it for different types of knitting I still have to look at a step by step procedure
    I have taught knitting and sewing, so feel comfortable in being able to impart my crafts!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Agree – reading your knitting is a really important skill! I will answer your questions in my blog!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Pingback: A Craft Quiz – FahrOut Fiber Adventures

  10. Stefanie says:

    When I first tried out knitting a baby sock, I realized I was joining the round upside down.

    Liked by 1 person

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